Cleveland Big Wheel Relay 2017

 

Each team has a minimum fundraising goal of $400. All teams will be entered into a tournament bracket, which will be single elimination until we've named our Cleveland Big Wheel Relay Championship Team of 2017. For more information please visit: here

We raise money to help families like CJ's:

 

 

$37,321.61

Received of $35,000.00

454 Donations

  • $870.00

    Tremont Tap House

  • $50.00

    Brian & Kristine Downie

  • $20.00

    Ben Kroeck

  • $70.00

    The Sweet Spot

  • $20.00

    Ken & Nancy Kase

  • Jason Borthen

  • $103.09

    Kevin Ruddock

  • $100.00

    Stephen & Alice Baluch

  • Christopher Lehfeldt

  • $25.00

    Brian Freeman

  • $50.00

    Square Sales - Day of

  • $1661.00

    Raffle/T-shirt Sales Day of Event

  • $103.09

    Margaret Breloff

  • Karen ONeil

  • $154.64

    Larry Wolf

  • $25.00

    John Walsh

  • $412.37

    Thomas Bear

  • $100.00

    Ron Cass

  • Anonymous

  • $25.77

    Jonathon Wise

  • $100.00

    Dan Craft

28 Teams

We are "newbies" to the Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, but we are thrilled to be able to help raise money for such a wonderful cause.  We are  PTs and OTs from MetroHealth and want to support our Speech Therapist buddies to continue to serve children and adults who suffer from various neurological disorders. 

Please donate to our team to help made a difference in our community!

      

Megan, Rob, Mitch & Mike, have come together to race on a trike.  

Don't let our name fool you, "yes" shut eye is our play.  But we will awake to win on the day!

Born deaf, Anton Mays had his first experiences with Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center at just 3 years old when his mother brought him to the Center to be fitted for hearing aids. Over the years, Anton would visit the Center for check-ups during his school years.

Anton, like many Deaf adults his age, did not have the advantage of early intervention in infancy as deaf babies have today. Consequently, he did not get introduced to language until he entered school and struggled during his school years, continually lagging behind in reading and writing skills and acquiring English. Anton attended the A.G. Bell School in Cleveland until 8th grade and then went to the Deaf program at Beachwood High School.

Anton graduated from high school but had difficulty finding and maintaining employment in the Cleveland area over the years. At the age of 32 he decided to move to Columbus where he found a job as a janitor. He met other individuals from the Deaf community and found an apartment and roommate. All went well initially - his friend and roommate appeared to be honest and trustworthy. With time however, his roommate stopped paying his portion of the bills and took advantage of Anton’s generosity.  In addition, both men were unaccustomed to living independently and were unfamiliar with the rules and regulations that dictated their government entitlements. Moreover, both had minimal ability to read and write, thus limiting understanding of written materials and information. Not knowing where to find help and resources in the Columbus area, bills and unanswered letters from the Social Security Administration (SSA) mounted and eventually resulted in Anton owing large sums of money.   

There are so many things hearing people take for granted when accessing assistance or navigating the world around them - even something as simple as calling SSA for an appointment poses numerous challenges for a deaf person.  Although Anton is a bright, outgoing young man, his lack of language development in formative years resulted in limited English proficiency and consequently limited ability to read and write.

Anton’s financial and social life were in turmoil and he turned to his girlfriend for advice. She suggested he come back to Cleveland and contact the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (CCDHH) at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC).

So, in 2015 Anton quit his job in Columbus and moved back to Cleveland. He lived with friends for a short period of time until they could no longer afford to house him. One of them contacted CCDHH for an appointment. By the time he came in, his social security and food stamp benefits had been suspended. He had no income and no home. CCDHH staff worked in partnership with one of the homeless shelters in the city and assisted them in understanding the unique needs of a Deaf individual. CCDHH was able to help him get his benefits reinstated and could then assist him in searching for an apartment. CCDHH staff accompanied him to every meeting with landlords and eventually found a caring and compassionate owner willing to rent an apartment to Anton despite his tarnished rental history. From there, CCDHH helped him to establish utilities and to get furniture. CCDHH continues to work with him to ensure that bills are paid on time and all correspondence is understood.

Like any new mother, Elizabeth Picklo was excited about the upcoming birth of her son. She had lots of hopes and dreams for him - all the typical thoughts and plans: watching him play and grow, go off to school, make friends, start driving and dating, etc. And, CJ was born two months early, Elizabeth still felt happy and confident when he was released from NICU after only three weeks. Once at home, she settled into her role as a new mother with CJ.

However, over time, Elizabeth began to notice that CJ wasn’t reaching various communication milestones – he wasn’t speaking at all. CJ’s pediatrician recommended hospital-based evaluation and therapy, but with a wait list of over a year, she felt they would lose crucial development time for CJ.

That’s when Elizabeth discovered CHSC through an online search and the family was thrilled to find out they could get an appointment within weeks.

After CJ’s evaluation, he began working with a CHSC Speech Language Pathologist. He has and continues to build vocabulary and makes tremendous progress.

CJ is now 5 years old and is working hard to prepare for Kindergarten. Elizabeth knows he’ll be ready when the time comes. She says, “We wouldn’t be where we are today with CJ’s progress if it weren’t for CHSC. They have not only given him the skills he needs to succeed – they have given me back my hopes and dreams for him.”

When you donate to Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, you’re literally changing lives for the better. We know that early intervention is key for children of all backgrounds and that’s why we exist. Your donation does more than just help, it is transformative in the lives of the families we serve.

Please consider making a donation today – because the people we serve can’t wait for tomorrow.

Our team is back and excited to be able to participate in this race again to raise money for the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center.  They are near and dear to our hearts because they have helped my daughters Emily and Claire who are hearing impaired.  My team is comprised of my awesome and supporting family members who are look forward to this race every year and I am so grateful of their support.  My teammates are such good sports in dressing up in the costumes that I pick out each year.  It is an honor and privilage to be able to give back by helping to raise money for the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center which helps so many adults and kids each year everyone there is so nice and they bend over backwards to help you.  

Regional Infant Hearing Program (R.I.H.P.) at Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center gave my twins the gift of hearing.  They were born deaf, which is not detected in any ultrasound.  I was unprepared and needed answers with solutions.  R.I.H.P. provided me with with speech-language, learning, hearing and deaf services.  Thanks to RIHP the twins have BAHA Power-5 hearings aids and attend kindergarten like normal kids.  

Our team, The Cleveland Chaos, formerly The Flying Communicators, is back to defend its fundraising title!!  As you may remember, The Flying Communicators won the top fundraising title in 2015 and 2016.  We’ve rebranded the team this year by giving it a brand new and exciting name, and we’re all extremely thrilled to be able to participate in this fun race again to raise money for the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center, an agency that is near and dear to our hearts. This year’s team is comprised of members of the Center’s Deafness Advocacy Committee and its friends. 

The Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center is the oldest and premier provider of speech-language, hearing, and deafness services in the United States… and it’s located right here in Cleveland!  Annually, Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center serves over 6,000 infants, children and adults. As a local nonprofit organization, they provide services regardless of a person’s ability to pay.  To ensure that the Center can continue to provide the highest quality of service regardless of income, they need support from our local community.  Please help The Cleveland Chaos do EVEN BETTER this year by making a donation. No donation is too small ... your donation, whether its $10 or $500, will make the difference between a good result and a great result.  We hope you will help The Cleveland Chaos make annual Cleveland Big Wheel Relay a HUGE SUCCESS and consider making a donation today.  

We look forward to sharing the day with you!  Thank you in advance for your support!

Laura, Maria, Dennis and Elwin

Born deaf, Anton Mays had his first experiences with Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center at just 3 years old when his mother brought him to the Center to be fitted for hearing aids. Over the years, Anton would visit the Center for check-ups during his school years.

Anton, like many Deaf adults his age, did not have the advantage of early intervention in infancy as deaf babies have today. Consequently, he did not get introduced to language until he entered school and struggled during his school years, continually lagging behind in reading and writing skills and acquiring English. Anton attended the A.G. Bell School in Cleveland until 8th grade and then went to the Deaf program at Beachwood High School.

Anton graduated from high school but had difficulty finding and maintaining employment in the Cleveland area over the years. At the age of 32 he decided to move to Columbus where he found a job as a janitor. He met other individuals from the Deaf community and found an apartment and roommate. All went well initially - his friend and roommate appeared to be honest and trustworthy. With time however, his roommate stopped paying his portion of the bills and took advantage of Anton’s generosity.  In addition, both men were unaccustomed to living independently and were unfamiliar with the rules and regulations that dictated their government entitlements. Moreover, both had minimal ability to read and write, thus limiting understanding of written materials and information. Not knowing where to find help and resources in the Columbus area, bills and unanswered letters from the Social Security Administration (SSA) mounted and eventually resulted in Anton owing large sums of money.   

There are so many things hearing people take for granted when accessing assistance or navigating the world around them - even something as simple as calling SSA for an appointment poses numerous challenges for a deaf person.  Although Anton is a bright, outgoing young man, his lack of language development in formative years resulted in limited English proficiency and consequently limited ability to read and write.

Anton’s financial and social life were in turmoil and he turned to his girlfriend for advice. She suggested he come back to Cleveland and contact the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (CCDHH) at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC).

So, in 2015 Anton quit his job in Columbus and moved back to Cleveland. He lived with friends for a short period of time until they could no longer afford to house him. One of them contacted CCDHH for an appointment. By the time he came in, his social security and food stamp benefits had been suspended. He had no income and no home. CCDHH staff worked in partnership with one of the homeless shelters in the city and assisted them in understanding the unique needs of a Deaf individual. CCDHH was able to help him get his benefits reinstated and could then assist him in searching for an apartment. CCDHH staff accompanied him to every meeting with landlords and eventually found a caring and compassionate owner willing to rent an apartment to Anton despite his tarnished rental history. From there, CCDHH helped him to establish utilities and to get furniture. CCDHH continues to work with him to ensure that bills are paid on time and all correspondence is understood.

CHSC's Community Center for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing staff team!

Erie Warriors is led by Charles “Pat” Pattison who is a member of New Partners and returning to challenge the field once again on June 24th in Tremont!  If you have time available,  I'd recommend stopping by and check out the biggest Little race in town along with the food & beverage trucks.

His teammates are Morgan Pattison (recently married Pat a few weeks ago), Brian Kauffman (high school friend) and Nick Cobos (Pat & Morgan’s wedding officiant).  Thanks to everyone who has donated and for your continued support to our team & The Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center!

Gabriel Partners is a Cleveland based company that helps fight against money laundering and financial fraud. This is our first year in the relay,and we are so excited to be a part of such a great cause!  We love giving back to our Cleveland community! We may be new to the race, but watch out, because we can get catty. 

Like any new mother, Elizabeth Picklo was excited about the upcoming birth of her son. She had lots of hopes and dreams for him - all the typical thoughts and plans: watching him play and grow, go off to school, make friends, start driving and dating, etc. And, CJ was born two months early, Elizabeth still felt happy and confident when he was released from NICU after only three weeks. Once at home, she settled into her role as a new mother with CJ.

However, over time, Elizabeth began to notice that CJ wasn’t reaching various communication milestones – he wasn’t speaking at all. CJ’s pediatrician recommended hospital-based evaluation and therapy, but with a wait list of over a year, she felt they would lose crucial development time for CJ.

That’s when Elizabeth discovered CHSC through an online search and the family was thrilled to find out they could get an appointment within weeks.

After CJ’s evaluation, he began working with a CHSC Speech Language Pathologist. He has and continues to build vocabulary and makes tremendous progress.

CJ is now 5 years old and is working hard to prepare for Kindergarten. Elizabeth knows he’ll be ready when the time comes. She says, “We wouldn’t be where we are today with CJ’s progress if it weren’t for CHSC. They have not only given him the skills he needs to succeed – they have given me back my hopes and dreams for him.”

When you donate to Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, you’re literally changing lives for the better. We know that early intervention is key for children of all backgrounds and that’s why we exist. Your donation does more than just help, it is transformative in the lives of the families we serve.

Please consider making a donation today – because the people we serve can’t wait for tomorrow.

Like any new mother, Elizabeth Picklo was excited about the upcoming birth of her son. She had lots of hopes and dreams for him - all the typical thoughts and plans: watching him play and grow, go off to school, make friends, start driving and dating, etc. And, CJ was born two months early, Elizabeth still felt happy and confident when he was released from NICU after only three weeks. Once at home, she settled into her role as a new mother with CJ.

However, over time, Elizabeth began to notice that CJ wasn’t reaching various communication milestones – he wasn’t speaking at all. CJ’s pediatrician recommended hospital-based evaluation and therapy, but with a wait list of over a year, she felt they would lose crucial development time for CJ.

That’s when Elizabeth discovered CHSC through an online search and the family was thrilled to find out they could get an appointment within weeks.

After CJ’s evaluation, he began working with a CHSC Speech Language Pathologist. He has and continues to build vocabulary and makes tremendous progress.

CJ is now 5 years old and is working hard to prepare for Kindergarten. Elizabeth knows he’ll be ready when the time comes. She says, “We wouldn’t be where we are today with CJ’s progress if it weren’t for CHSC. They have not only given him the skills he needs to succeed – they have given me back my hopes and dreams for him.”

When you donate to Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, you’re literally changing lives for the better. We know that early intervention is key for children of all backgrounds and that’s why we exist. Your donation does more than just help, it is transformative in the lives of the families we serve.

Please consider making a donation today – because the people we serve can’t wait for tomorrow.

Like any new mother, Elizabeth Picklo was excited about the upcoming birth of her son. She had lots of hopes and dreams for him - all the typical thoughts and plans: watching him play and grow, go off to school, make friends, start driving and dating, etc. And, CJ was born two months early, Elizabeth still felt happy and confident when he was released from NICU after only three weeks. Once at home, she settled into her role as a new mother with CJ.

However, over time, Elizabeth began to notice that CJ wasn’t reaching various communication milestones – he wasn’t speaking at all. CJ’s pediatrician recommended hospital-based evaluation and therapy, but with a wait list of over a year, she felt they would lose crucial development time for CJ.

That’s when Elizabeth discovered CHSC through an online search and the family was thrilled to find out they could get an appointment within weeks.

After CJ’s evaluation, he began working with a CHSC Speech Language Pathologist. He has and continues to build vocabulary and makes tremendous progress.

CJ is now 5 years old and is working hard to prepare for Kindergarten. Elizabeth knows he’ll be ready when the time comes. She says, “We wouldn’t be where we are today with CJ’s progress if it weren’t for CHSC. They have not only given him the skills he needs to succeed – they have given me back my hopes and dreams for him.”

When you donate to Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, you’re literally changing lives for the better. We know that early intervention is key for children of all backgrounds and that’s why we exist. Your donation does more than just help, it is transformative in the lives of the families we serve.

Please consider making a donation today – because the people we serve can’t wait for tomorrow.

Let's Get Physical is a team lead by Lori Lynn Cartellone (New Partner Past President), the team has raced for the past 4 years with a few substitutions when it come to racing members although always producing fabulous costumes, you may remember us as the Tina's on team Big Wheels Keep on Turning in '16. This year we have Suzanne Brickman, Lori Lynn Cartellone Rachel Stair and Ciera Waller racing for the gold! Taking our training seriously, we thought the team name Let's Get Physical would be perfect! Thank you in advance for your donation to help us meet our fundraising goal!

We wanted to share this story with you about Anton Mays so you'd know a little bit more about how these fundraising dollars help real people in our community.

Born deaf, Anton had his first experiences with Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center at just 3 years old when his mother brought him to the Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center to be fitted for hearing aids and that is where his story with the Center begins.

Anton, like many Deaf adults his age, did not have the advantage of early intervention in infancy as deaf babies have today. Consequently, he did not get introduced to language until he entered school and struggled during his school years, continually lagging behind in reading and writing skills and acquiring English. Anton attended the A.G. Bell School in Cleveland until 8th grade and then went to the Deaf program at Beachwood High School.

Anton graduated from high school but had difficulty finding and maintaining employment in the Cleveland area over the years. At the age of 32 he decided to move to Columbus where he found a job as a janitor. He met other individuals from the Deaf community and found an apartment and roommate. All went well initially - his friend and roommate appeared to be honest and trustworthy. With time however, his roommate stopped paying his portion of the bills and took advantage of Anton’s generosity.  In addition, both men were unaccustomed to living independently and were unfamiliar with the rules and regulations that dictated their government entitlements. Moreover, both had minimal ability to read and write, thus limiting understanding of written materials and information. Not knowing where to find help and resources in the Columbus area, bills and unanswered letters from the Social Security Administration (SSA) mounted and eventually resulted in Anton owing large sums of money.   

There are so many things hearing people take for granted when accessing assistance or navigating the world around them - even something as simple as calling SSA for an appointment poses numerous challenges for a deaf person.  Although Anton is a bright, outgoing young man, his lack of language development in formative years resulted in limited English proficiency and consequently limited ability to read and write.

Anton’s financial and social life were in turmoil and he turned to his girlfriend for advice. She suggested he come back to Cleveland and contact the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (CCDHH) at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC).

So, in 2015 Anton quit his job in Columbus and moved back to Cleveland. He lived with friends for a short period of time until they could no longer afford to house him. One of them contacted CCDHH for an appointment. By the time he came in, his social security and food stamp benefits had been suspended. He had no income and no home. CCDHH staff worked in partnership with one of the homeless shelters in the city and assisted them in understanding the unique needs of a Deaf individual. CCDHH was able to help him get his benefits reinstated and could then assist him in searching for an apartment. CCDHH staff accompanied him to every meeting with landlords and eventually found a caring and compassionate owner willing to rent an apartment to Anton despite his tarnished rental history. From there, CCDHH helped him to establish utilities and to get furniture. CCDHH continues to work with him to ensure that bills are paid on time and all correspondence is understood.

Born deaf, Anton Mays had his first experiences with Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center at just 3 years old when his mother brought him to the Center to be fitted for hearing aids. Over the years, Anton would visit the Center for check-ups during his school years.

Anton, like many Deaf adults his age, did not have the advantage of early intervention in infancy as deaf babies have today. Consequently, he did not get introduced to language until he entered school and struggled during his school years, continually lagging behind in reading and writing skills and acquiring English. Anton attended the A.G. Bell School in Cleveland until 8th grade and then went to the Deaf program at Beachwood High School.

Anton graduated from high school but had difficulty finding and maintaining employment in the Cleveland area over the years. At the age of 32 he decided to move to Columbus where he found a job as a janitor. He met other individuals from the Deaf community and found an apartment and roommate. All went well initially - his friend and roommate appeared to be honest and trustworthy. With time however, his roommate stopped paying his portion of the bills and took advantage of Anton’s generosity.  In addition, both men were unaccustomed to living independently and were unfamiliar with the rules and regulations that dictated their government entitlements. Moreover, both had minimal ability to read and write, thus limiting understanding of written materials and information. Not knowing where to find help and resources in the Columbus area, bills and unanswered letters from the Social Security Administration (SSA) mounted and eventually resulted in Anton owing large sums of money.   

There are so many things hearing people take for granted when accessing assistance or navigating the world around them - even something as simple as calling SSA for an appointment poses numerous challenges for a deaf person.  Although Anton is a bright, outgoing young man, his lack of language development in formative years resulted in limited English proficiency and consequently limited ability to read and write.

Anton’s financial and social life were in turmoil and he turned to his girlfriend for advice. She suggested he come back to Cleveland and contact the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (CCDHH) at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC).

So, in 2015 Anton quit his job in Columbus and moved back to Cleveland. He lived with friends for a short period of time until they could no longer afford to house him. One of them contacted CCDHH for an appointment. By the time he came in, his social security and food stamp benefits had been suspended. He had no income and no home. CCDHH staff worked in partnership with one of the homeless shelters in the city and assisted them in understanding the unique needs of a Deaf individual. CCDHH was able to help him get his benefits reinstated and could then assist him in searching for an apartment. CCDHH staff accompanied him to every meeting with landlords and eventually found a caring and compassionate owner willing to rent an apartment to Anton despite his tarnished rental history. From there, CCDHH helped him to establish utilities and to get furniture. CCDHH continues to work with him to ensure that bills are paid on time and all correspondence is understood.

Like any new mother, Elizabeth Picklo was excited about the upcoming birth of her son. She had lots of hopes and dreams for him - all the typical thoughts and plans: watching him play and grow, go off to school, make friends, start driving and dating, etc. And, CJ was born two months early, Elizabeth still felt happy and confident when he was released from NICU after only three weeks. Once at home, she settled into her role as a new mother with CJ.

However, over time, Elizabeth began to notice that CJ wasn’t reaching various communication milestones – he wasn’t speaking at all. CJ’s pediatrician recommended hospital-based evaluation and therapy, but with a wait list of over a year, she felt they would lose crucial development time for CJ.

That’s when Elizabeth discovered CHSC through an online search and the family was thrilled to find out they could get an appointment within weeks.

After CJ’s evaluation, he began working with a CHSC Speech Language Pathologist. He has and continues to build vocabulary and makes tremendous progress.

CJ is now 5 years old and is working hard to prepare for Kindergarten. Elizabeth knows he’ll be ready when the time comes. She says, “We wouldn’t be where we are today with CJ’s progress if it weren’t for CHSC. They have not only given him the skills he needs to succeed – they have given me back my hopes and dreams for him.”

When you donate to Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, you’re literally changing lives for the better. We know that early intervention is key for children of all backgrounds and that’s why we exist. Your donation does more than just help, it is transformative in the lives of the families we serve.

Please consider making a donation today – because the people we serve can’t wait for tomorrow.

We know that you care about communication and fully recognize how important it is for our community.  We also know that you want to bet on the winningnest team in the 2017 Big Wheel Relay, benefitting the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center!!!! That team is M&Ms.  Combining the brute force of top administrators, a front line employee, a board member of CHSC, and a Cuyahoga County Councilperson (for real), there is no better team to support!  Every year at CHSC, provide speech, hearing and deafness services to the community, regardless of a person's abiity to pay.  Join us in supporting this essential organization.

We'll tear up the track with our mighty fierceness.  We're so fast, our crispy candy coating might run. Don't blink!

Like any new mother, Elizabeth Picklo was excited about the upcoming birth of her son. She had lots of hopes and dreams for him - all the typical thoughts and plans: watching him play and grow, go off to school, make friends, start driving and dating, etc. And, CJ was born two months early, Elizabeth still felt happy and confident when he was released from NICU after only three weeks. Once at home, she settled into her role as a new mother with CJ.

However, over time, Elizabeth began to notice that CJ wasn’t reaching various communication milestones – he wasn’t speaking at all. CJ’s pediatrician recommended hospital-based evaluation and therapy, but with a wait list of over a year, she felt they would lose crucial development time for CJ.

That’s when Elizabeth discovered CHSC through an online search and the family was thrilled to find out they could get an appointment within weeks.

After CJ’s evaluation, he began working with a CHSC Speech Language Pathologist. He has and continues to build vocabulary and makes tremendous progress.

CJ is now 5 years old and is working hard to prepare for Kindergarten. Elizabeth knows he’ll be ready when the time comes. She says, “We wouldn’t be where we are today with CJ’s progress if it weren’t for CHSC. They have not only given him the skills he needs to succeed – they have given me back my hopes and dreams for him.”

When you donate to Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, you’re literally changing lives for the better. We know that early intervention is key for children of all backgrounds and that’s why we exist. Your donation does more than just help, it is transformative in the lives of the families we serve.

Please consider making a donation today – because the people we serve can’t wait for tomorrow.

2017 Cleveland Big Wheel Relay!

We are VERY excited for our first Big Wheel Relay! Racing to support a great cause while having a fun time!

Please help support Paislee's Pilots in honor of the Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center! We are so thrilled to be returning for a second year in a row in honor of our daughter Paislee Lynn! Paislee was born with a moderate to severe hearing loss in November, 2014. Through the support and services of the Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center, we are proud to say that Paislee continues to thrive and grow. She has surpassed milestones and amazes us every day. Communication is everything !!!! Without CHSC, we would not be where we are today! 

Paislee gives us the drive and motivation we need every day ! 

Thank you for supporting this worthy cause!!

We are The Adventurists! 

Chip Tighe, Andrew Ryzner, Mike Richuisa, and Nick Longo will carry the baton for this Adventure. The rest of us; their freinds, their family, and their fellow adventurists, will be on hand to lend support and cheer, and if need be, to resuscitate our fallen. 

Please join us on Saturday June 24th from 2-5pm at Lincoln Park in Tremont for the races. It will be a great time.

Please support these four in this endeavor, but more importantly, please support the good work that is being done at The Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center. Thank you!

When you donate to Cleveland Big Wheel Relay, you’re literally changing lives for the better. We know that early intervention is key for children of all backgrounds and that’s why we exist. Your donation does more than just help, it is transformative in the lives of the families we serve.

Please consider making a donation today – because the people we serve can’t wait for tomorrow.

Thompson Hine Terrors returns in 2017 to avenge a series of early exits from the Race the past several years, but more importantly, to build on its fundraising successes for the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center.  Team Captain, Devin Barry's son was a participant of the Center's Regional Infant Hearing Program, which provided invaluable assistance in evaluating his son's hearing loss and ensuring his speech development was on track through 2 years of age.  At nearly 4 years old, Devin's son is now testing above his age for speech and other development milestones thanks to the assistance he received from the Center.

The Center provides a wide range of services beyond the Regional Infant Hearing Program and assists individuals throughout Northeast Ohio with hearing and speech development services.  Many of these services are provided free-of-charge to individuals in need.  Likewise, please consider donating to the Thompson Hine Terrors to fund the Center's programs and also allowing our team to "win" bragging rights for its fundraising prowess.  Thank you!

"Blood Makes You Related, But Loyalty Makes You Family"

The team that took the first Big Wheel Championship is back again and looking to take back the Championship Crown!

We are the meanest bunch of riders on the track (not really), known and feared the world over (we are pretty ferocious, just look at those guns!), and are ready to leave the other teams in our dust!

Most importantly, we are so excited to be one of the few teams that have raced in this great event since it started, and hope that you can help us reach our team goal and raise money for the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center.  It truly is wonderful organization that offers a wide array of services to people in Northeast Ohio who experience speech, language, communication and/or hearing disorders, regardless of their ability to pay.

Please join our efforts and make a donation today, regardless of the amount anything you can support will make the Center’s mission to help serve this community possible!

Born deaf, Anton Mays had his first experiences with Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center at just 3 years old when his mother brought him to the Center to be fitted for hearing aids. Over the years, Anton would visit the Center for check-ups during his school years.

Anton, like many Deaf adults his age, did not have the advantage of early intervention in infancy as deaf babies have today. Consequently, he did not get introduced to language until he entered school and struggled during his school years, continually lagging behind in reading and writing skills and acquiring English. Anton attended the A.G. Bell School in Cleveland until 8th grade and then went to the Deaf program at Beachwood High School.

Anton graduated from high school but had difficulty finding and maintaining employment in the Cleveland area over the years. At the age of 32 he decided to move to Columbus where he found a job as a janitor. He met other individuals from the Deaf community and found an apartment and roommate. All went well initially - his friend and roommate appeared to be honest and trustworthy. With time however, his roommate stopped paying his portion of the bills and took advantage of Anton’s generosity.  In addition, both men were unaccustomed to living independently and were unfamiliar with the rules and regulations that dictated their government entitlements. Moreover, both had minimal ability to read and write, thus limiting understanding of written materials and information. Not knowing where to find help and resources in the Columbus area, bills and unanswered letters from the Social Security Administration (SSA) mounted and eventually resulted in Anton owing large sums of money.   

There are so many things hearing people take for granted when accessing assistance or navigating the world around them - even something as simple as calling SSA for an appointment poses numerous challenges for a deaf person.  Although Anton is a bright, outgoing young man, his lack of language development in formative years resulted in limited English proficiency and consequently limited ability to read and write.

Anton’s financial and social life were in turmoil and he turned to his girlfriend for advice. She suggested he come back to Cleveland and contact the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (CCDHH) at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC).

So, in 2015 Anton quit his job in Columbus and moved back to Cleveland. He lived with friends for a short period of time until they could no longer afford to house him. One of them contacted CCDHH for an appointment. By the time he came in, his social security and food stamp benefits had been suspended. He had no income and no home. CCDHH staff worked in partnership with one of the homeless shelters in the city and assisted them in understanding the unique needs of a Deaf individual. CCDHH was able to help him get his benefits reinstated and could then assist him in searching for an apartment. CCDHH staff accompanied him to every meeting with landlords and eventually found a caring and compassionate owner willing to rent an apartment to Anton despite his tarnished rental history. From there, CCDHH helped him to establish utilities and to get furniture. CCDHH continues to work with him to ensure that bills are paid on time and all correspondence is understood.

Help Us support Anton and many others, this is a great cause for great people!

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Team Tap House "Keep On Rollin"

Born deaf, Anton Mays had his first experiences with Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center at just 3 years old when his mother brought him to the Center to be fitted for hearing aids. Over the years, Anton would visit the Center for check-ups during his school years.

Anton, like many Deaf adults his age, did not have the advantage of early intervention in infancy as deaf babies have today. Consequently, he did not get introduced to language until he entered school and struggled during his school years, continually lagging behind in reading and writing skills and acquiring English. Anton attended the A.G. Bell School in Cleveland until 8th grade and then went to the Deaf program at Beachwood High School.

Anton graduated from high school but had difficulty finding and maintaining employment in the Cleveland area over the years. At the age of 32 he decided to move to Columbus where he found a job as a janitor. He met other individuals from the Deaf community and found an apartment and roommate. All went well initially - his friend and roommate appeared to be honest and trustworthy. With time however, his roommate stopped paying his portion of the bills and took advantage of Anton’s generosity.  In addition, both men were unaccustomed to living independently and were unfamiliar with the rules and regulations that dictated their government entitlements. Moreover, both had minimal ability to read and write, thus limiting understanding of written materials and information. Not knowing where to find help and resources in the Columbus area, bills and unanswered letters from the Social Security Administration (SSA) mounted and eventually resulted in Anton owing large sums of money.   

There are so many things hearing people take for granted when accessing assistance or navigating the world around them - even something as simple as calling SSA for an appointment poses numerous challenges for a deaf person.  Although Anton is a bright, outgoing young man, his lack of language development in formative years resulted in limited English proficiency and consequently limited ability to read and write.

Anton’s financial and social life were in turmoil and he turned to his girlfriend for advice. She suggested he come back to Cleveland and contact the Community Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (CCDHH) at Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC).

So, in 2015 Anton quit his job in Columbus and moved back to Cleveland. He lived with friends for a short period of time until they could no longer afford to house him. One of them contacted CCDHH for an appointment. By the time he came in, his social security and food stamp benefits had been suspended. He had no income and no home. CCDHH staff worked in partnership with one of the homeless shelters in the city and assisted them in understanding the unique needs of a Deaf individual. CCDHH was able to help him get his benefits reinstated and could then assist him in searching for an apartment. CCDHH staff accompanied him to every meeting with landlords and eventually found a caring and compassionate owner willing to rent an apartment to Anton despite his tarnished rental history. From there, CCDHH helped him to establish utilities and to get furniture. CCDHH continues to work with him to ensure that bills are paid on time and all correspondence is understood.

This year, we are raising money in support of our mom, Teri.  Teri is one of three older adults who suffers from age-related hearing loss.  The Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center helps diagnose and treat age-related hearing loss, in addition to serving the deaf community and those with speech disorders. Please help support team Wheelie Wheelie Fast, CHSC and folks like our mom - thank you!